Debate

View All Debates

Posted On: November 9, 2014

Lets’s Talk Cancer – Cancer Prevention & Cure – Is enough being done?

Open Debate

What do you think?

25%
voted yes
75%
voted no

Representing the sides

Imoh Okon
Yes

Imoh Okon

Chief Consultant at Jess-Riel Consulting LLC. Author of “Winning the Fight Against CANCER: a Layman’s Guide”

READ MORE
Jonas Schattauer
No

Jonas Schattauer

Dr. Schattauer is an Integrative Oncologist at Eastern Regional Medical Center. He is board certified in medical oncology and internal medicine, as well as hospice, palliative medicine and integrative medicine. He has extensive clinical experience in the management of pancreatic, breast, lung and brain cancers.

READ MORE

About this debate

Lets's Talk Cancer - Cancer Prevention & Cure – Is enough being done?

Discussion will address amongst others:

1. Trying to understand cancer & ways of minimizing the impact of the disease
2. Existing treatments, advances in biomedical research & emerging treatments, non-conventional alternatives strategies
3. Discover the current best practice options for cancer detection, diagnosis, treatment, prevention and management available to men and women
4. Help empower cancer patients and improve the overall patient experience
5. Partnerships, Networks and knowledge sharing with leaders in the field of therapeutic radiography
6. Gain insight from the patient’s perspective
7. Understand the means available to help partners, family members and friends of patients access information and support at every step
8. Receive answers to difficult or challenging questions
9. Other matters raised by Doctors, Cancer patients, survivors and the public

Obieze Nzewunwa
The moderator's opening remarks
Aug 19, 2014 Obieze Nzewunwa

Hello everyone and welcome to today’s debate. I’m Dr. Obieze Nwanna – Nzewunwa, a physician and global health scientist currently affiliated with the University of California, San Francisco. Today’s topic is one of global health importance as its impact touches on various aspects of life because you we are all affect directly or indirectly by cancer. Permit me to put this in context especially for the non-medial participants.

Growth is essential in all spheres of life. It is a characteristic of all living things. The growth we observe in our bodies is attributable to an increase in the size and number of cells in the human body and it occurs at different rates throughout life. This process is orchestrated with remarkable precision and tightly regulated. It is only in death that we cease to grow but the paradox of life is that excessive growth of cell can lead to death because the abnormal cells which grow uncontrollably usurp the nutrients of the normal ones. This deprivation of normal cells, and the spread to other body parts, amongst other subtle reasons is the reason why cancer is fatal. In the words of Edward Abbey, “growth for the sake of growth is the ideology of a cancer cell”.

Today Dr. Imoh Okon and Mrs. Juliet Uzo-Agu offer us their position on cetain aspects of cancer, it’s treatment, public response, the role of the government and pharmaceutical and regulatory bodies in finding a sustainable solution. In view of their comments we would be taking your response(s) and questions and you would have the opportunity t vote on each aspect discussed.
Thank you and I hope we all have a wonderful experience today as we begin

Eminent Dr’s, could you discuss

2. Existing treatments, advances in biomedical research and emerging treatments, non-conventional alternatives and strategies

Dr. Schattauer, to what level do you think the patient should be involved in the choice of care and the overall treatment plan?

Dr. Schatteur affirms that more needs to be done at the primary health care level, to improve awareness and early detection of cancer. In your opinion Dr. Okon, what do you think can be done to achieve this in developing countries.


Debate Section

Imoh Okon
The proposer's opening remarks
Aug 19, 2014 Imoh Okon

Cancer remains a very sensitive issue to discuss. From clinicians, to patients and researchers, a complete cure is all that is simply required. But cancer is not such a simple disease to tackle. In fact, cancer is a group of diseases that present many similar characteristics with respect to dysfucntional cellular processes, and ability to adapt to micro and macro-environments.
The causes, symptoms, diagnoses, disease presentation and response to therapies are specific to each patient. Hence, cancer is not a “one-size-fits-all” disease.
The intrinsic and highly dynamic adaptation capabilities by tumor cells is what allows them to circumvent and survive treatments. Conditions that would typically destroy “normal” cells, such as hypoxia (low oxygen) or metabolic alterations are utilized by cancer cells, allowing them to thrive under such conditions.
Like other disease types, prevention remains best option against cancer. Failing that, early detection strategies is next. Improvements on existing therapies or discoveries of novel drugs remains the last viable option.
Why do previously drug-responsive tumors become resistant? A critical understanding of mechanistic, cellular perturbations that contribute to treatment failure is required to tackle resistance or identify patients that will benefit from particular treatments.
A lot of effort, on multiple fronts is being waged in the war against cancer, but surely, there is plenty room for improvements.
In addition to traditional strategies, such as gene mutations, non-conventional approaches need to be considered. An emerging example is boosting the immune system to fight the cancer from within.
Working together, we can make cancer history in our life time.

Jonas Schattauer
The opposition's opening remarks
Aug 19, 2014 Jonas Schattauer

A wealth of epidemiological research shows that certain modifiable and habitual behaviors are linked to increased cancer risk; these include tobacco use, UV exposure and obesity-related behaviors such as overeating and physical inactivity. Despite awareness of the link between these behaviors to the risk of cancer and other diseases, many individuals find it difficult to change those behaviors. Research on basic decision-making processes, emotion, and motivation, could shed light on why people fail to alter behavioral patterns and could inform the development of interventions to increase healthy behaviors and ultimately improve cancer outcomes.

Opportunities exist to leverage methodological perspectives and tools from sciences (e.g., marketing and consumer science, industrial and organizational psychology, neuroscience) far afield of traditional cancer research to understand and change behaviors known to increase cancer risk.The implication of this sccess would be, reduced cancer morbidity and mortality as a result of modified health behaviors associated with disease risk.

Government can play a role in shaping the behavior of citizens through education and outreach. Although we don’t know all the facts about cancer, we do know that certain forms are preventable and can be detected early, so programs can be implemented to reduce risk behaviors. In addition, with a true national health care system sponsored by the government, like those found in many parts of Europe, we would see a more proactive approach to health that could help prevent cancer, treat it earlier, and keep costs down

Obieze Nzewunwa
Obieze Nzewunwa answered about 4 years ago

With these final comments we can all it a day. The debate may be over but our collective fight against cancer is far from over. Let us not dichotomized seggregate ourseleves as patients or doctors or policy makers or pharmaceutical companies.

 

We are all human so we are all patients either directly or indirectly. This uniting factor shoul be our strength.

Make the rest of your days beautiful and meaningful; and bring joy to others. Thank you all for participating. Enjoy the week ahead. 
Goodbye.

Jonas Schattauer
Jonas Schattauer answered about 4 years ago

Thank you very much my fellow Doctors Imoh & Nzenwunwa & the PanAtlantic Journal for the committment to the fight against this disease.We have been truly inspired by all contributions.

 

I am delighted to join this discourse as we observe prostrate cancer awareness month, rolling off last month October observace of Breast Cancer awareness motnh. During this discussion we provided an important opportunity to highlight one of the most critical health issues impacting people around the globe. It is a time to reflect on past accomplishments, to recognize current efforts underway, and to acknowledge that many challenges still lie ahead.

 

It was a privilege to hear from our diverse audience today and learn about their exceptional work, experience, fight and on-going examples. Yvonne Odegbami remain resolute and strong in your fight against ovarian cancer and effort to come out to encourage survivors, patients and awareness to the generall public. Juliet Azo-Agu your personal battle with breast cancer and work with Courage to dare in providing practical support care for the underserved are all examples of enormously constructive ways to address the cancer challenge. Their courage in championing a cause that is making a positive difference on behalf of health worldwide is truly inspiring. Please join me in applauding these amazing women(and those who will still participate in this discussion) for their commitment and continued efforts.

 

We can help by drawing attention to the need for more work to be doe about cancer and sharing information about resources that are available. By highlighting the importance of early screenings, self examinations, and improved medical and support services we can help save lives by detecting cancer in its early stages and educating people about how to protect their health.

 

Raising awareness about this important issue requires dedication, commitment, and passion. Your participation in this discussion in raising global awareness of breast cancer this November is crucial to the cause. However you choose to take action this month, know that your efforts will be making a difference in the lives of many.

 

I look forward to working with all of you as we do our part to raise global awareness of breast cancer. Thank you.

Imoh Okon
Imoh Okon answered about 4 years ago

Excellent debate and feedback with divergent views but in complete agreement on the nature of the problem and the need for more work. The efforts of  Juliet via her foundation is critical to reaching the wider population with a simple but clear message. Clinicians and medical professionals also deserve commendations. We are on the same team, and nothing could be more satisfying than making cancer history. To achieve this ill  required  perseverance, focus, commitment, dedication and oneness of purpose.

Obieze Nzewunwa
Obieze Nzewunwa answered about 4 years ago

I would like to take the final word from our debater right now. Dr. Okon and Dr. Schatteur, thank you for your robust arguments. 

May we have your concluding statements now please. . .

Obieze Nzewunwa
Obieze Nzewunwa answered about 4 years ago

I must admit this ha been an evye opening debate.
It is eveident that cancer patients require an immense amount of support because once they get the diagnosis, their lives would be changed forever because from that point onwards it’s a race against time. There is so muchinformationthat the patient would have to assimulate in so little time about every aspect of his/her health.

Additionally, each patient needs a support system it may be the family, friends etc. but these are all groups of people who care but may not have the experience, information or clinical expertise to make major impact. Thus bringing to mind the important role played by cancer survivors. 

This debate has shown that cancer patients and survivors have a pivotal role to in the formulation of policies and regulations that affect cancer treatment options.

Cancer survivors also play a key role in creating a support ssystem for those battling cancer. Identifying with a support group or cancer advocacy Nonprofit has immense positive benefits. I would like to appreciate Mrs Uzo-Agu a cancer survivor who participated very actively in this debate. I also want to commend her selfless effort to fight for others who have to go through what she went through. By creating a non -profit organization “Courage to Dare”, she provides hope for those who think there is no hope for cancer patients.The fact that she breathes everyday makes her a beacon of hope for everyone struggle  to defeat cancer. If she can beat cancer and Yvonne Odegbami can beat cancer then you can beat cancer. To find out more about Juliet’ struggle and NGO pleaase visit http://www.couragetodare.org/ 

 

As we are about to wrap up.

Jonas Schattauer
Jonas Schattauer answered about 4 years ago

You are right Dr. Imoh the scourge of cancer is indeed gobal.

 

Good work Juliet. Commendable. Do keep the awesome work with Courage To Dare Up. Statistics has shown that what cancer patients need most is a practical support system from diagnosis to treatment life-cycle.

Imoh Okon
Imoh Okon answered about 4 years ago

I have seen many run down African American communities with no fresh vegetable grocery stores, but unlimited junk fast food chains that are not healthy.  ThEze communities lack the resources or even health insurance to pursue adequate and standard care. Complete lack of access and support  systems. 

Imoh Okon
Imoh Okon answered about 4 years ago

I have seen many run down African American communities with no fresh vegetable grocery stores, but unlimited junk fast food chains that are not healthy.  ThEze communities lack the resources or even health insurance to pursue adequate and standard care. Complete lack of access and support  systems. 

Imoh Okon
Imoh Okon answered about 4 years ago

Prostate cancer among men is also a stimatized subject, hence many men don’t know who to talk to and where to seek help.

 

Even in developed countries like the USA cancer disparities exist with respect to access and affordability of treatments.  Published data from FDA and BCI c l clearly demonstrate that  even though African-Americans have a lesser cancer incedence,  their pronouns is often worse, mainly due to late diagnosis and lack of resources for superior car. So even though  cancer affects more Caucasians,  more African-Americans die from the disease.  So beyond the challenges facing developing countries where there is a gross lack of resources at every level, similar issues exists in highly developed countries, especially as it pertains to certain demographics and race. 

Jonas Schattauer
Jonas Schattauer answered about 4 years ago

In developing countries, the majority of women diagnosed with breast cancer do not survive because their cancer is detected too late. SO we have begun noticing is the important for promoting awareness of breast cancer in low- and middle-income countries, where illiteracy, religious beliefs and health, gender and social inequities often prevent women from having access to services and information, particularly on the importance of seeking treatment early if cancer is detected.

 

For exmple the advocacy power of breast cancer can be harnessed to promote broader efforts to empower women and to promote women’s health in general. Like Juliet (your are welcome), herself a survivor and also one with first hand experience with factors like stigma and discrimination also severely hamper women’s decisions and ability to seek medical advice if they find a breast lump. Women often struggle to “come out” publicly about their breast cancer for fear of being abandoned by their partners or of losing their jobs”

 

According to the International Agency for Research on Cancer, breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer among women, with an estimated 2.31 million cases diagnosed worldwide in 2011. It is also the most frequently reported cause of death from cancer in women in both developed and developing countries. Breast cancer survival rates vary greatly worldwide, ranging from 80% or more in North America, Sweden and Japan to around 60% in middle-income countries and less than 40% in low-income countries. The low survival rates in less-developed countries are mainly due to late diagnosis of the majority of cases and so the need for massive awareness.

 

Breast cancer prevention is not simply about educating and empowering women; equipping health workers with the appropriate skills and attitudes is also crucial. “In developing countries, many women arrive with late-stage tumours that could have been detected at the primary-care level. But we have not trained primary-care nurses and physicians to recognize the symptoms that could be related to cancer, to undertake clinical breast examination or to review family history of breast cancer. They have been trained to believe that these aren’t the major killers of poor people, so they shouldn’t be looking out for them, and they aren’t.”

 

Early detection does not necessarily depend on expensive diagnostic equipment. In countries that don’t have widely available mammography technology for mass screening, routine clinical examination performed by well-trained community health workers, nurses and physicians can help diagnose more cases earlier.Detection is just the first step. The next step is to make sure the patient receives the results of appropriate tests and is guided to treatment.

 

Juliet also made a well-founded point that I cant agree more with. And that is that  more can be done at the primary level and that hospitals may not always be the best places to treat cancer patients in developing countries, particularly when long-term chemotherapy schedules may require women to travel far from home and their families.

 

In my opinion enough is not being done as far as awareness programmes to give visibility to the need for more women to get screened and treated for breast cancer. This drive should be done more at the grannular level.

Imoh Okon
Imoh Okon answered about 4 years ago

Hi Dr. Jonas. I’m sure you have several excellent input and examples  .  Thanks for many wonderful view points  and contributions.  for a wonderful view point and contributions. 

Imoh Okon
Imoh Okon answered about 4 years ago

Technological advances is a major reason I think we are better equipped to tackle cancer. There are no shortages of resources,  from hospitals,  cancer charties and governmental agencies. At the cancer center here, there is a library and many free information leaflets at the reception. We are also experiencing increased collaborations between healthcare professionals, a critical component of effective care.

To a large extent, patients trust their doctors advice, which may sometimes require further testing or referral to a specialist. I encourage patients and family members to be fully engaged in treatment process, ask questions and understand the implications of treatments or procedures. 

Jonas Schattauer
Jonas Schattauer answered about 4 years ago

Willkommen! (as we would say in Germany), looking foward to this robust conversion.

Gooday Doctors Imoh and Nzenwunwa.

Obieze Nzewunwa
Obieze Nzewunwa answered about 4 years ago

Information is power. As physicians who come in contact with cancer patients very often, could, please share your thoughts on the importance of patient education/awareness and the role of the patient in the choice of care. 

Obieze Nzewunwa
Obieze Nzewunwa answered about 4 years ago

Hello everyone,
I would like to welcome you all back to thte second segment of the debate. Yesterday, Dr Okon and Dr. Schattauer discussed certain vital aspect of cancer, it’s possible causes and the importance of health policies and regulations in the control of substances like tobacco which can cause cancer.

Today we forge ahead with other pertinent issues. 

Imoh Okon
Imoh Okon answered about 4 years ago

Emerging cancer treatment strategies include immunotherapy which simply aims to prime the immune system to enable it fight the cancer from within. Along the same line is the concept of cancer vaccines. I think identification of early biomarkers may help early intervention strategies which is critical to cancer treatment. With respect to non-conventional treatment strategies, attention and scientific validation of various spices and herbs that have been claimed to possess anti-cancer properties should be investigated

Jonas Schattauer
Jonas Schattauer answered about 4 years ago

While early detection is the best form of prevention, there are several techniques that are used to treat cancer and include – Surgery,radiation therapy, chemotherapy, Hormone therapy and Immunotherapy. Everything else has been branded “unapproved,” non-effective,” or “quackery” despite overwhelming evidence to the contrary.

Advances are being made in cancer medical research daily. Recently i attended a seminar that discussed that is been found that a gene previously unassociated with breast cancer plays a pivotal role in the growth and progression of the triple negative form of the disease, a particularly deadly strain that often has few treatment options. Their research, suggests that targeting the gene may be a new approach to treating the disease.These & others prove that the envelope is being pushed, but prevention still remains NO.1.

 

From a scientific perspective, the principal reason why the war on cancer has largely failed is due to an almost obsessive and myopic focus on targeting cancer cells and tumors at the expense of addressing the underlying factors that cause cancer in the first place. As a result, while oncologists now have an array of new and superior chemotherapeutic drugs and gene therapies at their disposal, the truth is that overall cancer remission rates are little changed from the 1950s.  To make matters worse, cancer is now striking earlier than ever before. It is not uncommon for men and women who are only in their 30s to be diagnosed with prostate or breast cancer; a fact that was virtually unthinkable a decade ago.

 

Complementary and alternative are terms used to describe many kinds of products, practices, and systems that are not part of mainstream medicine. You may hear them used to refer to methods to help relieve symptoms and improve quality of life during cancer treatment. We call these “complementary” because they are used along with your medical treatment. You may sometimes hear them when discussing methods that claim to prevent, diagnose, or treat cancer. We call these “alternative” because they are used instead of proven medical treatments.

 

You may not hear about these treatments from your doctor or cancer team, but others may talk about such things as traditional Chinese medicine, acupuncture, hypnosis, or machines that are supposed to find or cure cancer. Some people may recommend “body cleansing” with enemas or detoxification diets with special foods and preparation methods.Some of these methods must be done by a person with formal education and training, such as art or music therapy, and may even be offered along with regular cancer treatment. Others are given by people with informal or traditional training. They can involve everything from colon therapy to entirely different systems that don’t use any of the medical treatments your doctor uses. Still other types of treatment may be recommended by the person who is selling a product in a store or TV infomercial, such as herbals or juice from exotic fruits or vegetables.

 

Some methods take a lot of time and cost a lot of money, such as strict diets or travel to another country for special treatments. Others are fairly cheap and easy to use, like vitamins, herbs, or homeopathic remedies.Complementary and alternative methods are often appealing because they use your own body, your own mind, or things found in nature. Some even promise wellness using a way that sounds simple, wholesome, and without side effects – something your doctor can’t offer. Another plus is that these are things that you, and only you, choose to do.

 

It’s known that some of these methods almost never cause harm, while others can be dangerous and have even caused deaths. But by definition, those that claim to cure cancer are nearly all unproven — methods that are well-proven to safely fight cancer tend to be adopted into mainstream medicine fairly quickly. On the other hand, there are methods that have been studied and shown to help a person feel better during cancer treatment.

 

The decision to use alternative or complementary methods is an important one, and it is yours to make

Obieze Nzewunwa
Obieze Nzewunwa answered about 4 years ago

Eminent Doctor’s, could you kindly discuss

2. Existing treatments, advances in biomedical research & emerging treatments, non-conventional alternative strategies etc?

Imoh Okon
Imoh Okon answered about 4 years ago

Dr. Jonas has provided depth on what cancer is and suggested plan of actions. With respect to minimizing cancer incedence, all hands must be on deck. Only by concerted and combined efforts from every person, groups, organizations and teams can the disease be tackled.

Jonas Schattauer
Jonas Schattauer answered about 4 years ago

Dr. Nzewunwa some of the practical aspects of starting treatment for  cancer, such as finding the right health care team and dealing with financial and insurance issues is mostly dependent on your geographcal location as Juliet and Yvonne had previously brought to the fore.Finding the right health care team to treat your cancer isn’t always easy. Once you have learned you have cancer, choosing your doctor and treatment center is one of the most important decisions you will make.

 

When you find out you have cancer, there are many things to think about and many decisions to make. Most people with cancer are not experts on cancer treatment. You probably don’t feel like you have the time, energy, or resources to figure out how and where to get the best cancer care. You might need some help.The doctor who found your cancer is the first person you should ask. Try asking this: “If you found out that you or someone you loved had this cancer, which doctor would you go to for treatment?” In many cases, the doctor will suggest another doctor even if you don’t ask.

 

If your doctor isn’t sure of your diagnosis, but thinks there’s a chance you might have cancer, you can ask: “If you were in my place, which doctor would you see first?” Ask for at least 2 or 3 names, and find out what these doctors’ specialties are. Find out which cancer centers they work with and which health insurance plans they accept.

Before you start looking for a doctor, think about the qualities you want your doctor to have, as in experience treating your type of cancer, descion to pick a doctor who practices (has privileges) at a hospital that you are willing to use. Choose a doctor you feel comfortable with. Languages spoken, gender, ethnicity, and educational background may be important to you.

 

Next would be to make a list of doctors who might be a good fit, eg referrals from people you trust, like your primary care doctor.If you are in a health plan, you can check the names you get against their list of network doctors.

After all that, It is important for you to be able to talk frankly and openly with your cancer care team. They want to answer all of your questions, no matter how minor they might seem. Trying to understand your treatment options can be overwhelming. If you’re considering radiation or chemotherapy to treat your cancer, try a multimedia program from Emmi Solutions to help you and your loved ones know what to expect(this is just my personal opinion, there are other good ones also).

 

Emmi® programs help you and your loved ones make sense of vital health information. These multimedia programs explain what to expect before, during and after your procedure or treatment.

  • Page 1 of 2
  • 1
  • 2

Comments

comments

Comments from the floor

Juliet Uzo-Agu
Juliet Uzo-Agu answered about 4 years ago

Thank you for the points made Dr. Schattauer. Based on all the research and trips to Africa, i think that awareness education is very crucial but not just to individuals, we should also help equip our medical professionals with enough resources that will keep them well informed.

Many at times, we tend to put blames on the professionals in Africa for jobs not well done, as much as that might have partial truths to it, i believe that we also have to understand that this professionals find themselves working with the little the access to

It is an all rounder. As much as i am very particular about individuals and communities who have little or no access to any form of resource or funding, i think more programs can be created and enforced for our professionals to get appropriate training that can help cut down on the death rate.

We have come in contact with cases where patients try to save up funds for treatments to travel outside Africa for better treatments but then, many of those cases either never make it to their destinations, or it has metastasized, or they run out of funds due to cost of accomodation and for others, they turn out very successful. I just think that with our local healthcare sectors weighing into this issue, better centers can be built  or better still existing centers can be better equipped for better treatment

 

 

Juliet Uzo-Agu
Juliet Uzo-Agu answered about 4 years ago

Thank you for the points made Dr. Schattauer. Based on all the research and trips to Africa, i think that awareness education is very crucial but not just to individuals, we should also help equip our medical professionals with enough resources that will keep them well informed.

Many at times, we tend to put blames on the professionals in Africa for jobs not well done, as much as that might have partial truths to it, i believe that we also have to understand that this professionals find themselves working with the little the access to

It is an all rounder. As much as i am very particular about individuals and communities who have little or no access to any form of resource or funding, i think more programs can be created and enforced for our professionals to get appropriate training that can help cut down on the death rate.

We have come in contact with cases where patients try to save up funds for treatments to travel outside Africa for better treatments but then, many of those cases either never make it to their destinations, or it has metastasized, or they run out of funds due to cost of accomodation and for others, they turn out very successful. I just think that with our local healthcare sectors weighing into this issue, better centers can be built  or better still existing centers can be better equipped for better treatment

 

 

Juliet Uzo-Agu
Juliet Uzo-Agu answered about 4 years ago

Thank you for the points made Dr. Schattauer. Based on all the research and trips to Africa, i think that awareness education is very crucial but not just to individuals, we should also help equip our medical professionals with enough resources that will keep them well informed.

Many at times, we tend to put blames on the professionals in Africa for jobs not well done, as much as that might have partial truths to it, i believe that we also have to understand that this professionals find themselves working with the little the access to

It is an all rounder. As much as i am very particular about individuals and communities who have little or no access to any form of resource or funding, i think more programs can be created and enforced for our professionals to get appropriate training that can help cut down on the death rate.

We have come in contact with cases where patients try to save up funds for treatments to travel outside Africa for better treatments but then, many of those cases either never make it to their destinations, or it has metastasized, or they run out of funds due to cost of accomodation and for others, they turn out very successful. I just think that with our local healthcare sectors weighing into this issue, better centers can be built  or better still existing centers can be better equipped for better treatment

 

 

Juliet Uzo-Agu
Juliet Uzo-Agu answered about 4 years ago

Thank you for the points made Dr. Schattauer. Based on all the research and trips to Africa, i think that awareness education is very crucial but not just to individuals, we should also help equip our medical professionals with enough resources that will keep them well informed.

Many at times, we tend to put blames on the professionals in Africa for jobs not well done, as much as that might have partial truths to it, i believe that we also have to understand that this professionals find themselves working with the little the access to

It is an all rounder. As much as i am very particular about individuals and communities who have little or no access to any form of resource or funding, i think more programs can be created and enforced for our professionals to get appropriate training that can help cut down on the death rate.

We have come in contact with cases where patients try to save up funds for treatments to travel outside Africa for better treatments but then, many of those cases either never make it to their destinations, or it has metastasized, or they run out of funds due to cost of accomodation and for others, they turn out very successful. I just think that with our local healthcare sectors weighing into this issue, better centers can be built  or better still existing centers can be better equipped for better treatment

 

 

Juliet Uzo-Agu
Juliet Uzo-Agu answered about 4 years ago

Thank you Dr. Schattauer , as a naturalized American but originally from Africa, right after my diagnosis and emerging a survivor. I felt the need to render my voice to countless individuals with no voice. Courage To Dare was founded, an approved 501 (c) (3) organization, that serves as a bridge to help medical professionals and lay people alike, to understand the impact of breast cancer amongst African women and men and promote access to treatment. The organization seeks:

·   Collaborative partnerships with western world based and International Medical Institutions, Foundations and Individuals, to provide screenings, treatment, equipment, supplies, and financial assistance to support individuals diagnosed with this disease.

·   Advocate for African individuals who suffer from Breast Cancer, including serving as an advocate for families and interacting with medical professionals and institutions on behalf of the individual diagnosed with Breast Cancer.

Conduct public education activities, seminars and forums, and events to increase Breast Cancer Awareness in African Communities.

·         Serve as a global organization that will help eradicate the diagnosis of this disease and a bridge to help International Medical Professionals understand the impact amongst Africans and how the culture influences decision to get treatment.

 

·         To Erase the Stigma that is deeply rooted in our culture on viewing this disease as a death sentence.

Juliet Uzo-Agu
Juliet Uzo-Agu answered about 4 years ago

Thank you Dr. Schattauer , as a naturalized American but originally from Africa, right after my diagnosis and emerging a survivor. I felt the need to render my voice to countless individuals with no voice. Courage To Dare was founded, an approved 501 (c) (3) organization, that serves as a bridge to help medical professionals and lay people alike, to understand the impact of breast cancer amongst African women and men and promote access to treatment. The organization seeks:

·   Collaborative partnerships with western world based and International Medical Institutions, Foundations and Individuals, to provide screenings, treatment, equipment, supplies, and financial assistance to support individuals diagnosed with this disease.

·   Advocate for African individuals who suffer from Breast Cancer, including serving as an advocate for families and interacting with medical professionals and institutions on behalf of the individual diagnosed with Breast Cancer.

Conduct public education activities, seminars and forums, and events to increase Breast Cancer Awareness in African Communities.

·         Serve as a global organization that will help eradicate the diagnosis of this disease and a bridge to help International Medical Professionals understand the impact amongst Africans and how the culture influences decision to get treatment.

 

·         To Erase the Stigma that is deeply rooted in our culture on viewing this disease as a death sentence.

Juliet Uzo-Agu
Juliet Uzo-Agu answered about 4 years ago

Is there a lot be done on Cancer prevention? Yes, a lot is been done but the question is, is that enough? Probably not enough, especially in underserved African communities…Is enough being done to enable cut down on the death rate in underserved continents like Africa?  No, I don’t think enough is being done to address the uprising death rate.

 

There is a huge need to help more desperate individuals around us, but then, how many can be helped in a society like ours (Africa) where patients die before the angel of death gets to them, where they are financially incapacitated, and where gender-bias is the order of the day?. Majority of African Countries as we may know or not know, are the least able to cope especially where there are very few or no Cancer Care Services.

 

There is a huge need for more research, advocacy and structured healthcare systems in Africa. Due to lack of resources and lack of infrastructure in Africa, most Africans have no access to cancer screening, early diagnosis, treatment or palliative care which leads to painful and distressing death.

 

 

So how much help can we do to help individuals financially, help the health systems and professionals in under-served communities in Africa? 

Jonas Gonzales
Jonas Gonzales answered about 4 years ago

A highlight of some important Natural Cancer Treatment as stated by experts in the field include:

Gerson Therapy and Juicing

The Budwig Protocol

Proteolytic Enzyme Therapy

Vitamin C Chelation

Frankincense Essential Oil Therapy

Probiotic Foods and Supplements

Sunshine and Vitamin D3

Turmeric and Curcumin

Oxygen Therapy and Hyperbaric Chamber

Prayer and Building Peace

 

Detailed information on this link: http://draxe.com/10-natural-cancer-treatments-hidden-cures/

 

 

Katherine Pusch
Katherine Pusch answered about 4 years ago

Moderator, Dr Imoh and Mrs Agu, can you

1. throw some light on healthy lifestyles that help prevent cancer.

2. those one need to speak to an oncologist for cancer screening or is it a process that can be discussed with a Family General Practice Medical Doctor?

View All Debates